Dealing With Difficulty, Praising Performance: More Updates on the Children

Posted on by More Than Me

Last week we introduced a few of our teacher reports, and mentioned some of the issues to consider while reading them.

Rather than introduce everything, I thought I would just post a few and then provide a few thoughts. One quick note, as in other posts, all of the last names have been omitted; however, some of the students listed below have the same first names as students listed in the previous post.

Lovetee, she is not constant in school, her coming to school is off and on. Her behavior in school is a very excellent one always well behave, but her academic performance is poor.. Whenever she come from school she have to take market to and sell for mother, and so no time to look over her lesson.

Morrisline, she come every day, and regular in class and her academic performance is excellent. She has a very good behavior. ( class A,B,C )

Patience, she come to school every day and regular ion class she some time behavior stubborn, and her academic performance is fair. ( class G-3 ).

Grace, she is regular in class and always on time, her academic performance is excellent. She love to be among her friends, she has a very good behavior.( class G-2 )

Princess, she always regular in school and on time, she has some skin diseases on her body, fir that she behave sick in class her behavior is fine, and her academic performance is poor. ( class A,B,C ).

Aguline, she come to school every day and regular in class and her academic performance is excellent, she has a very good behavior. ( class G-2 ).

Rosaline, she regular in class and prompt on time, her academic is excellent, she well behave. Prospective graduate from kindergarten. ( class K-2 )

Esther, she has serious problem relating to coming to school, well she very, very brilliant student. from the time she was promoted to the second grade she stop coming to school. ( class G-2 ).

Our students, like students everywhere, are good in class, and, well, not so good in class; they are class presidents, and class clowns; they are growing up and learning. As you can see, they also have to deal with being in school for the first time, contributing to family income, sickness, instability, and a host of other issues that come with living in West Point. Some of the news about academic performance is unfortunate. The family and health issues are troubling.

However, the fact of regular attendance, getting reports on all of the children from the schools, and being able to see even a little social and academic growth are all steps toward progress. Frankly, if we received reports that said every child we gave a scholarship to was a class president, that’s when we would really start to worry. When you listen to stories from the kids, see their photos and videos, and talk to Katie about their personalities, it is clear that all of these children are bright and gifted. Whatever issues have come up, we will do our best to make sure we help in the most appropriate way possible.

In the next post, we will write about how we deal with academic performance, accountability, and mentoring. Please let us know what you think in the comments, on Facebook, and through Twitter.

About More Than Me

More Than Me is on the ground fighting Ebola. We’ve seen results. We were in Liberia before Ebola, we’re here now, and we’ll be here long after to ensure that vulnerable children have choices for their futures.
This entry was posted in More Than Me and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Dealing With Difficulty, Praising Performance: More Updates on the Children

  1. Keep your articles coming. I really like following your stuff. Many thanks.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*


*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

124

mtm girls in school

464,112

Global Supporters

106

countries represented